YikeBike Carbon Review

Yikebike Carbon Electric Bike Review
Yikebike Carbon
Yikebike Carbon Folded
Yikebike Carbon Lights
Yikebike Carbon Foot Rests
Yikebike Carbon Two Wheels Attachment
Yikebike Carbon Two People
Yikebike Carbon Electric Bike Review
Yikebike Carbon
Yikebike Carbon Folded
Yikebike Carbon Lights
Yikebike Carbon Foot Rests
Yikebike Carbon Two Wheels Attachment
Yikebike Carbon Two People

Summary

  • Ultra portable folding electric transport that rides like a bike without pedals, this is the utlra light weight version made with Carbon fiber
  • Folds to just 1.52 cubic feet, weighs less than 25 pounds and can be lifted with one hand
  • Sophisticated electronics include front and rear lights, turn signals, blinkers, horn chirp and regenerative braking

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

YikeBike

Model:

Carbon

Price:

$4,995

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Commuting, Travel, Urban

Electric Bike Class:

Throttle on Demand (Class 2)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

China, France, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, UAE, United States

Model Year:

20132014

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

24.7 lbs (11.2 kg)

Frame Types:

Compact, Folding

Frame Material:

Carbon Fiber and Composites

Frame Colors:

Black Carbon, Orange, Red, Blue, Green, Yellow, White

Pedals:

No Pedals, Aluminum Alloy Foot Pegs

Handlebar:

Hydro Formed Aluminum, Rear Wrap Design

Brake Details:

Regenerative Motor Brake

Saddle:

Foam with Water Resistant PU Cover

Seat Post:

Reinforced Fiberglass (Provides Flexibility for Comfort)

Rims:

Aluminum Extruded

Accessories:

Included: Carry Bag, Shoulder Strap, Tool Kit with Valve Adapter (to Inflate Front Tire) and Allen Keys, LED Headlights on Bar Ends, LED Rear Lights with Flashing Turn Signals and Chirping Noise, Optional Double-Wheel Rear Platform ~$600, Optional Extender Battery Pack, Can be Wrapped for Custom Colors and Logos

Other:

Rear Wheel is Fiberglass and Plastic with 6 Ply Tire with Thorn Proof Tube, Maximum Weight 220 lbs, Folded Size 43 liters, Recommended Rider Height: Between 5'1" and 6'4"

Electronic Details

Motor Type:

Front-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

200 watts

Motor Peak Output:

450 watts

Battery Voltage:

37 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

6.6 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

244.2 wh

Battery Brand:

Sony

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Manganese

Charge Time:

4 hours (1.5 Hours with Optional 5 Amp Fast Charger, Standard Charger is 2 Amps)

Estimated Min Range:

7 miles (11 km)

Estimated Max Range:

10 miles (16 km)

Display Type:

LED Console

Drive Mode:

Trigger Throttle (On Right Bar)

Top Speed:

14.3 mph (23 kph)

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Written Review

The YikeBike is more of a transporter than a bike because it’s fully electric powered, you can’t pedal it. It’s Composed of two wheels with one behind the other just like a bicycle but you steer partially with your legs and partially with handlebars that come from behind and wrap around the sides. It resembles the penny-farthing or “ordinary bicycle” of the mid 1800’s that had a very large front wheel and smaller stabilizer in the rear. And just like these old fashioned bikes, the YikeBike can be a bit unstable at first. The YikeBike’s motor is built right in to the front wheel system and offers good torque for hill climbing, a decent top speed and even regenerative braking.

The YikeBike can be a thrilling experience for the first few rides because you rely on your legs to stabilize more than your arms and feet as with a more traditional bicycle. Thankfully, the seating position isn’t very far off the ground and the top speed is about 15 miles per hour so it doesn’t feel dangerous to learn. It operates much like the strider bicycles that have become popular for teaching kids how to ride. Once you’re moving forward, the bike becomes more stable and feet can be rested on two silver pegs extruding from the front wheel base. The trick to stabilizing the ride is gently squeezing your legs together to help steer the front wheel.

In my opinion, the YikeBike is all about enabling commuters. It makes getting to or from the subway, train or bus station more manageable. No more slow walks, no more sweating and best of all, no more oversized systems that are too heavy to lift. I’m talking to you Mr. Segway! The Carbon is the top of the line model weighing in at under 25 pounds! It folds down to the size of a large briefcase and can be carried in one hand. It also looks relatively cool (especially in the carbon weave) and won’t seem out of place leaning against a desk in an office. Taking just five seconds to completely fold or unfold, it truly is convenient.

Driving the YikeBike is a 450 watt motor built right into the front wheel. You can’t see it but you do hear it whirring as you squeeze the throttle on the right handlebar. 450 watts is quite a lot of power for such a small, lightweight system. The battery supporting this motor offers 37 volts of power and 6.6 amp hours of range. Overall, this is quite good and the bike feels very capable riding around on the flats. Even though the range and ride time is a bit more limited than full sized ebikes, the charge time is significantly less at just 1.5 or 4 hours depending on if you use the quick charger. If you left one charger at the office, you’d have no problem topping the YikeBike off before riding home or even out to lunch.

The downsides to this system are the learning curve to figure out how to ride, higher pricepoint (relative to the Synergy or Fusion) and lack of shock absorbers or suspension. Given the lower top speeds and primary use of sidewalks or bike lanes however, the YikeBike rides well enough and isn’t that uncomfortable. The tires offer a bit of give along with the seat and I found that pushing myself up using the foot rests reduced the shock of larger bumps. Overall, it’s a quirky but functional machine that does its job well. One of the big up-selling points from the lower end Fusion is the locking mechanism for the rear wheel. The two higher end YikeBikes also feature carbon accents and a slightly cooler frame design.

A lot of thought has gone into this very custom electric vehicle from New Zealand. It’s got headlights, tail lights, turn signals, flashing hazard lights and even a small chirping horn. It’s definitely a head turner, something you’d expect to see in a science fiction movie. Considering the price of ~$4,000 Carbon feels expensive but is definitely lighter weight. For an extra 6 pounds of weight you could save $2,000 and get the lower-end Fusion which is basically the same in terms of drive system.

I remember when the Segway came out, it got a lot of questions and criticism but eventually found a niche with security personnel and city tours. The YikeBike addresses the needs of a much larger audience on a more practical level. It cuts out that “extra mile” stopping so many people from commuting to work with more efficient, sustainable public transportation options. The Carbon is a wonderful electric “bike” but it won’t help you burn the same calories as a true pedaling ebike would. Keep that in mind because the max recommended weight is 220 pounds… Max recommended height is 6’4″.

Pros:

  • Folds and unfolds very easily and quickly
  • Gets extremely compact when folded, just 1.52 cubic feet – the size of a large briefcase
  • Weighs just under 25 pounds, liftable with one hand
  • Large and powerful 450 watt motor driven by 37 volt 6.6 amp hour battery pack
  • Features regenerative braking to extend range and smooth out stops
  • Includes front and rear lights, turn signals, hazards and an electronic horn
  • Optional “training wheel” system makes balancing easier and enables two riders but becomes annoying at higher speeds
  • Can be skinned for branding or promotional purposes and comes in seven color choices

Cons:

  • Takes a bit of practice to learn the best riding technique (squeeze front wheel with legs for stability)
  • No shocks or major cushions, still rides pretty well
  • Rides for less than one hour at full speed, can still travel ~10 miles per charge
  • Horn isn’t especially loud, mostly used like a bell to signal to pedestrians and other riders
  • The Carbon is $1,000 more than the Synergy and $2,000 more than the Fusion but offers basically the same kit at a few less pounds

Resources:

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Mark
3 years ago

Hi! It says that the riders weight must is 100kg, what happens with the passenger attachment as this would surely exceed the 100kg limit unless the two riders were featherweight! Thanks!

Court Rye
3 years ago

Hi Mark, that's a really great question... I'm not as familiar with the YikeBike and it's hard to comment on their weight limit. Where did you find the 100kg (220lb) weight limit? You make a great point that this seems low for two riders however I did see two people doing just this at Interbike (it was a man and a woman). Their combined weight was probably over 100kg as you suggest but I cannot say for sure. Maybe the stated max weight is for liability but the bike can actually work with more weight?

SEBAOON
2 years ago

Where can i find and buy your product in France or in Europe ? Thanks by advance for your answer. R.S

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crispyduck
1 week ago

Thank you. I'm hoping to find dealers to test ride these suggestions. I'm also looking at the EC1 carbon options.

Hong
1 week ago

Does anyone know of a bike shop in the San Francisco Bay Area that can source and install the NuVinci system on an electric bike?

Adding the NuVinci to a bike with regular gearing will be difficult (you have to tension the chain). Adding a Gates Carbon Belt Drive would be nearly impossible.

Luckily we've already got both on our Koben S. Feel free to email me when you'd like to try one.

Cheers,
Hong

NikkiK
2 weeks ago

Thanks guys, there's a lot of information in here to digest. After thinking about it some more, I wonder if I should not try to get the best out of all worlds (trail and road) because I may end up getting a mediocre at everything type of bike. I'm a traditionalist with my actual mtn. bike - Stunt Jumper hard tail from mid 90's. Every time I go to upgrade, I have a hard time justifying the purchase of something that doesn't have a motor. In this case of an ebike I guess I can make that justification a little better, but going up to the $5-7K range seems like I should be driving an entire car around (albeit a cheap car). I'm headed out to go 'test drive' a few bikes in Salt Lake and hope to be able to get a better feel for it. Considering the Magnum Peak as an all around, but will give the longer range ones a try too. Chris, the Riese & Muller Delite Mtn. looks like the top of the line and of course once I try one of those on (or it's equiv. bike in SLC) I'm sure I'll throw all caution out the wind and then want the best / most expensive. At this point though, I'm trying to keep the range closer to 2K. Maybe that's a pipe-dream, but I'll want to save some $$ to upgrade my actual mtn. bike one day. ;-)

One quick question though, how important is weight on these bikes? I noticed that some 'carbon fiber' bikes are only a few pounds difference than some other bikes and I would assume with the bike the Chris mentioned weight would really be a factor. Is there a different SOTP (seat of the pants) feel when driving vs peddling all that weight up hill / long distances?

scrambler
2 weeks ago

Regarding the Blade and the Carbon Gates, although they say it is supposed to have the same strength specs as the chains they replace... I have not actually been able to find a max power / max torque for it, they seem to be avoiding the subject...
That said, I would give up the belt if I could get the Bafang ultra.

I agree that the chainline may also be an issue on the FLX blade, although I have not found the chainline spec for the new 380x nuvinci.
I also agree that FLX is still an unknown entity as far as longevity and reliability is concerned, but all the E-bikes parts are standard, and not very complex to maintain.
So at this point the Blade / NuVinci scenario is more wishfull thinking around the perspective of getting better motor power than anything else :)
Good find on the alibaba FLX blade/attack clone by the way :) , and definitely, if FLX is already an unknow entity, Alibaba is one big extra step in that direction :)

I am aware the Bosch is one system with different limitations, but I have tried the 250W, and on steep hills, I find it is less than adequate. I also want to be able to pedal the bike fast at the 28mph limit, and this is why I am kind of setting the bar at the 350W version minimum.
But I may be overthinking that one, and in the end it may come down to compromise...

Agree on unknown reliability of the New Evelo bikes (mostly the new Bafand Max drive), that said, Bafang in general has a long track record now, and Evelo offers 4 years warranty, which buys some peace of mind :)

Interesting to hear about the Harmony Glitches. I have ridden several bikes with the NuVinci, but have not actually tried the Harmony. I do like the idea of simplicity of operation for my wife.
The Harmony does have the ability to be used in the regular manual mode of the NuVinci, so there is always that fallback.
Testing a harmony equipped bike is on my agenda next.

I am hoping more people will want the simplicity of use and maintenance of the configuration I am after, and that more manufacturer will offer it.

Thanks again for all the input, I am taking things slow, every perspective is valuable.

Ravi Kempaiah
2 weeks ago

Thank you for the quick answer, I will contact the newwheel to see what they could do and at what price.

I actually have the Tempo on a secondary list, but they only offer the 250W Bosch on that bike, and the fork is not a real suspension fork.
So for cheaper, the Evelo Galaxy looks like a better fit with a more powerful motor.
But other than that it is a great contender too.
The Atom also has a 250W motor and an IGH versus the Harmony, so also on the secondary list :)

Thanks again for your input

Most of the Bosch motors are 250W anyway. Even the speed motors. The US version is spec'd 350W but the hardware is absolutely same.
Going by Watts is the sure fire of completely misjudging a bike's capability. I suggest you visit a bike shop and ride it actually.
Harmony has some glitches and that is why manufacturers are not using them extensively.

EVELO Galaxy won't ship until late October and there is no guarantee of the reliability of the system.

Just like the ATOM Wave, most of the Specialized Levo bikes use the Brose system but most motors whether it is Bosch or Brose or Yamah put out significantly more.

You can't just take the FLX blade and add a NuVinci to it. The chainline won't work and the Bafang system will rip the Gates carbon drive in no time.
You can get the exact same BLADE model for $2000 here but I suggest you to stay away from products like that because down the line, you will end up struggling to find parts.

scrambler
2 weeks ago

Hi, new here, but long time lurker :)

I am looking into an E-bike for my wife that would ideally have the following characteristics

Integrated Torque / speed / cadence sensor for best of breed PAS
IGH, Ideally a NuVinci CVT, ideally with Harmony
Gates carbon drive belt system
Mid drive with as much power as possible for the steep hills of the SF Bay Area... The Bosch 350W would be a minimum, the new Bafang Max looks interesting with more torque, and the Bafang Max Ultra sounds exciting with 1000W...
Front suspension, plus suspension seat post for light trail riding.

I have a few on my radar (see below), none of which of course fit the complete bill, so I am looking at what it would take to customize one of the almost perfect ones to fit the bill.
One of these customization, would be to replace the rear derailleur and cassette by a NuVinci.

Hence my Question / post title.
Does anyone know of a bike shop in the San Francisco Bay Area that can source and install the NuVinci system on an electric bike?

Thank you for any insights.

PS: For those sharing the same specs interest, here is my current shortlist.
EVELO new Galaxy model (closest to spec at lowest price): Would need to add a suspension fork and seat posts.
FLX Blade (more exciting motor): Would need to Add the new NuVinci 380x, and a Belt drive system
RIESE &MUELLER Nevo (expensive, no throttle ): Would need to add the harmony controller
Other expensive contenders:
FELT versa E10; Cube SUV Hybrid pro 500; BULL Lacuba Evo E8 Wave

Eileensmacircle
1 week ago

Smacircle S1, the world’s most compact and lightweight ebike. Weighing only 15.4 lbs, carbon fiber S1 can be folded in five simple steps into a small backpack and carried wherever and whenever.

Eileensmacircle
3 weeks ago

http://bit.ly/S1IndiegogoSmacircle S1, the world’s most compact and lightweight ebike. Weighing only 15.4 lbs, carbon fiber S1 can be folded in five simpl e steps into a small backpack and carried wherever and whenever.

mrgold35
3 weeks ago

I'm 6'3" with the same 33/34 inseam. My bike looks almost identical to Lost bike with accessories and seat size. I hold on to one brake lever and tilt the bike close to a 45 degree angle towards me to swing my leg over the seat/Topeak rack bag to straddle before I sit on the seat. I use to lift my leg over the top tube; but, I kept on kicking the top tube and scratching the paint (the wife still mounts this way). The wife and I do switch off bikes and she sometimes scratches the top tube paint mounting the bike.

I added Lizard skin frame protection to help with that, Amazon, clear or carbon fiber, $16-$22: https://www.amazon.com/Lizard-Skins-Carbon-Leather-Protector/dp/B01DH2194I/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1501331504&sr=8-9-spons&keywords=lizard+skin+bike+frame+protection&smid=AMY4I718ZUBOU&th=1&psc=1https://

1/2
MacVado3.0
3 weeks ago

Yes, 15 mph is a huge disappointment for this kind of money. If I live in Europe I wouldn't be buying it with the 15mph limit. I can get my carbon hybrid up to 15mph with no problem. But the sad part is my LBS and their specailzied rep keep telling me that this bike only can do 16mph. I went to another dealer and drove their Vado 3.0 and it went 21mph.

Sonoboy
3 weeks ago

We are seeing some great looking bikes lately. You first had the development of the components, the Rohloff and NuVinci hubs, the Gates synchronous drive belt, the various front (and sometimes rear) pneumatic suspension systems, the hydraulic disc brakes (with anti-lock features on the horizon), various LED front and rear lights, frames of aluminum and carbon fiber, and finally, electrically powered drive systems with microprocessor controls and displays. Once you have all these great pieces to work with, it's very easy to plug them together in a modern CAD prototype and actually perform trial scenarios to test the ruggedness of the design. The picture above represents a coalescing of the industrial design; we are the ones to profit.

opimax
4 weeks ago

Front suspension on all my Stromers, at least 5 , currently have an st2 and 1, rode the 1 more often then the 2 till I got my front suspension, agree Carbon fork not much help or if it is much more was needed

nwroller
4 weeks ago

What kind of impact do you have from the front fork? I see one person mentioned the Redshift Shockstop to lessen feedback from the road. I think I'll add that to my Trek XM700+.
It is not that enjoyable.... One of the bike paths I take has a lot of tree root bumps in the asphalt, and I can feel it. Even with the body float I feel the need to get out of the saddle. I have looked into adding something, but have not pulled the trigger yet.

With that said, it is a lot better than I thought it would be. I figured it would be worse, but in reality my carbon road bike (28mm tires) feels just as bad on the hands. I think the 2" wheels are taking a lot of the punishment.

I do agree with others that the carbon fork is not a big enough difference to justify the cost. I believe you can fit the front suspension fork from Stromer on it. The cost would be more than a shockstop or similar, but another route I may consider in a year.

Velome
4 weeks ago

I thought I would give my ST1x review as it has been around a month and 200 miles since I received it in the mail. Sorry for the long post, but I hope someone will find all the information useful.

ORDER:
I decided to place an order with an E-bike shop instead of buying from my local shop because of the massive savings I received. I ordered the Sport (high bar) in 22" and charcoal. The shop upgraded me to the ST2 battery (814wh) and provided a body float seat post for a small charge. I got an email from Stromer the day after I placed the order to setup my account/app as the shop tied my bike to my phone number before it was shipped. It took about 12 days in total to get the bike, but there was a holiday weekend that increased that time. 7-10 days is probably reasonable expectation. Saving the 10% Seattle sales tax was also a contributing factor as they included shipping for free. All said and done very happy with the price and the shop I ordered from and would not have done it different.

RECEIVING:
The bike is in a large box that weights over 60 lbs. Because of this there was a local delivery company that did the final transit. Due to this it took an extra weekend to get to me because I had to schedule the delivery. They showed up in a 18-wheeler which caused the driver to have some issues blocking traffic on a busy road to hand truck the bike to my door. But all arrived safely and he wheeled it into my garage.

The bike came nearly fully assembled. I needed to straighten the handle bars (mm allen wrench) which was pretty easy (they are shipped at 90 degrees so the box is flatter). The peddles also needed to be screwed on - the right side goes on traditionally, the left is reverse threaded. I swapped out the seat post (cannot remember if the seat was on the bike or not when shipped), and I was all ready to go. Wheel reflectors, the charger were also in the box with manuals. The first charge took about 2-3 hours to be fully charged.

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS:
So much fun. I had tried out electric bikes before, but this was my first Speed Pedelec and really glad I went that direction, it is addicting. Some people say you work just as hard on an e-bike, but it is hard to explain why. I don't burn as many calories, but your muscles are still sore. You want to work hard just to maintain the speed and always feel the boost. So you work as hard, but over a shorter period of time because you are going so much faster.

The ST1x has a boost/throttle - kind of. If you hold the [+] button it will move you without peddling. But I have yet to have a situation where I could not peddle faster than the boost. On a flat it will get you to about 10-12 mph, on a decent hill you are lucky to get half that. In all cases I can get the bike to go at least 20%-100% faster by peddling at a moderate rate. The brakes squeak a bit (see the EBR videos, sounds the exact same) but they are solid. I am 6'3" 220lbs. The frame size is pretty good for me, but if you are 6'5" I think you might find it a bit too small - and they don't make it any bigger.

I have had several friends take it for a spin, they're all in love with it.

200 MILE REVIEW:
I have had a few issues so lets get those out of the way. About 20 miles in the right peddle was wobbling considerably. I took the peddle off and the aluminum threads were stripped. I put the peddle on so it is possible it was something I did, but I am pretty good with tools and am pretty sure it was a factory defect. I called the bike shop I ordered from and they shipped an entirely new bottom bracket and crankset. It took around 7 days to get that and another 2-3 for a bike shop to do the work (I did not have the right tools). It is working perfectly now. It was all done under warranty through the bike shop I purchased from - I d not call Stromer. All I had to do was send in photos and provide a write up. I think this was more to make sure they sent the right part than not trusting me.

At 100 miles I got a rear flat. Of course I didn't have a spare, pump or tools with me (Murphy!) so my wife picked me up and I swapped the tube with the same kind that came with the bike. I now have a trunk bag with a spare tube, tools and a pump. All of which I had, just not with me at the time.

I have a few complaints as well. The bike creeks a lot. Not sure what exactly is making the sound, but it sounds like tapping on a carbon frame (there is no Carbon), and it bothers me, but does not seem to an issue. Could be that I am too fat. The drivetrain is a little bit clunky. It does not shift as crisp as I would hope. Again, not an issue, but it bothers me. I have learned that if I am not in the right gear it will either not shift right away or will shift really hard. So as I come to a stop I move up a few sprockets to a larger one, and then gradually down shift as I pick up speed. I rarely ever use the largest cogs as with the motor it is rarely needed (even in 10-12% grade)

Absolutely love riding this bike. I rarely take it out of assist level 3 just because it is so much fun. I ride about 14 miles round trip to work and it takes me about 20-25 minutes each way - my commute is across a valley so steep hills going each way with some flat in the middle and a hand full of signals that have a long rotation. I average about 16-20mph. During peak traffic I can easily make the trip quicker than I could in a car. If I took it really easy I could probably get away without showering at work, but the way I ride I always sweat a bit. I charge it every other day and usually have about 50% battery left after the 28 miles. I have not rode it outside of commuting yet, so I have yet to test the range.

OMNI is alright. Signal strength is terrible and does not work from my house. I have a secure bike cage at work so I have only used the electric lock once. I don't really like the screens they have to choose from. I find myself switching between them on a regular basis. I think they could improve this quite a bit - perhaps ill get an update. Stromer - If you are reading this, reach out to me and I'll provide a bunch of feedback.

I added a mirror and upgraded the handle grips.

SUMMARY:
I would buy it again in a heartbeat. 28mph is a must - glad I got that 35 mph would be even better. Get a body float - my bumpy broken asphalt paths would have killed me without it.

Happy to answer questions if anyone has them - I probably could have written twice as much. I plan to do some videos as there is not a lot of info on the ST1x and I can walk through some of the above in more detail.
What kind of impact do you have from the front fork? I see one person mentioned the Redshift Shockstop to lessen feedback from the road. I think I'll add that to my Trek XM700+.

Sonoboy
4 weeks ago

Here is the link about the rules to flight with batteries.
http://www.catsa.gc.ca/guidelines-batteries
I heard crazy story in the past when lithium battery were first introduce and it almost took the plane down...
Just ask Boeing about this. They spent reams of money on the design of the 787, with its carbon fiber tube airframe which required the largest autoclave in the industry to 'bake' the finished tube. To meet the spec for weight, they replaced all 'standard' batteries on board with lithium cells, and almost lost the prototype several times due to fire. Not good. I believe they had to enclose all the lithium cells in a heavy fireproof container that negated any weight savings.

ronin2000
1 month ago

http://ebike-mtb.com/en/first-ride-review-specialized-turbo-levo-fsr-carbon-2018/

Summary, improved motor, better pedal sensing, more efficient, 600-650 grams lighter.

smitty
1 month ago

I thought I would give my ST1x review as it has been around a month and 200 miles since I received it in the mail. Sorry for the long post, but I hope someone will find all the information useful.

ORDER:
I decided to place an order with an E-bike shop instead of buying from my local shop because of the massive savings I received. I ordered the Sport (high bar) in 22" and charcoal. The shop upgraded me to the ST2 battery (814wh) and provided a body float seat post for a small charge. I got an email from Stromer the day after I placed the order to setup my account/app as the shop tied my bike to my phone number before it was shipped. It took about 12 days in total to get the bike, but there was a holiday weekend that increased that time. 7-10 days is probably reasonable expectation. Saving the 10% Seattle sales tax was also a contributing factor as they included shipping for free. All said and done very happy with the price and the shop I ordered from and would not have done it different.

RECEIVING:
The bike is in a large box that weights over 60 lbs. Because of this there was a local delivery company that did the final transit. Due to this it took an extra weekend to get to me because I had to schedule the delivery. They showed up in a 18-wheeler which caused the driver to have some issues blocking traffic on a busy road to hand truck the bike to my door. But all arrived safely and he wheeled it into my garage.

The bike came nearly fully assembled. I needed to straighten the handle bars (mm allen wrench) which was pretty easy (they are shipped at 90 degrees so the box is flatter). The peddles also needed to be screwed on - the right side goes on traditionally, the left is reverse threaded. I swapped out the seat post (cannot remember if the seat was on the bike or not when shipped), and I was all ready to go. Wheel reflectors, the charger were also in the box with manuals. The first charge took about 2-3 hours to be fully charged.

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS:
So much fun. I had tried out electric bikes before, but this was my first Speed Pedelec and really glad I went that direction, it is addicting. Some people say you work just as hard on an e-bike, but it is hard to explain why. I don't burn as many calories, but your muscles are still sore. You want to work hard just to maintain the speed and always feel the boost. So you work as hard, but over a shorter period of time because you are going so much faster.

The ST1x has a boost/throttle - kind of. If you hold the [+] button it will move you without peddling. But I have yet to have a situation where I could not peddle faster than the boost. On a flat it will get you to about 10-12 mph, on a decent hill you are lucky to get half that. In all cases I can get the bike to go at least 20%-100% faster by peddling at a moderate rate. The brakes squeak a bit (see the EBR videos, sounds the exact same) but they are solid. I am 6'3" 220lbs. The frame size is pretty good for me, but if you are 6'5" I think you might find it a bit too small - and they don't make it any bigger.

I have had several friends take it for a spin, they're all in love with it.

200 MILE REVIEW:
I have had a few issues so lets get those out of the way. About 20 miles in the right peddle was wobbling considerably. I took the peddle off and the aluminum threads were stripped. I put the peddle on so it is possible it was something I did, but I am pretty good with tools and am pretty sure it was a factory defect. I called the bike shop I ordered from and they shipped an entirely new bottom bracket and crankset. It took around 7 days to get that and another 2-3 for a bike shop to do the work (I did not have the right tools). It is working perfectly now. It was all done under warranty through the bike shop I purchased from - I d not call Stromer. All I had to do was send in photos and provide a write up. I think this was more to make sure they sent the right part than not trusting me.

At 100 miles I got a rear flat. Of course I didn't have a spare, pump or tools with me (Murphy!) so my wife picked me up and I swapped the tube with the same kind that came with the bike. I now have a trunk bag with a spare tube, tools and a pump. All of which I had, just not with me at the time.

I have a few complaints as well. The bike creeks a lot. Not sure what exactly is making the sound, but it sounds like tapping on a carbon frame (there is no Carbon), and it bothers me, but does not seem to an issue. Could be that I am too fat. The drivetrain is a little bit clunky. It does not shift as crisp as I would hope. Again, not an issue, but it bothers me. I have learned that if I am not in the right gear it will either not shift right away or will shift really hard. So as I come to a stop I move up a few sprockets to a larger one, and then gradually down shift as I pick up speed. I rarely ever use the largest cogs as with the motor it is rarely needed (even in 10-12% grade)

Absolutely love riding this bike. I rarely take it out of assist level 3 just because it is so much fun. I ride about 14 miles round trip to work and it takes me about 20-25 minutes each way - my commute is across a valley so steep hills going each way with some flat in the middle and a hand full of signals that have a long rotation. I average about 16-20mph. During peak traffic I can easily make the trip quicker than I could in a car. If I took it really easy I could probably get away without showering at work, but the way I ride I always sweat a bit. I charge it every other day and usually have about 50% battery left after the 28 miles. I have not rode it outside of commuting yet, so I have yet to test the range.

OMNI is alright. Signal strength is terrible and does not work from my house. I have a secure bike cage at work so I have only used the electric lock once. I don't really like the screens they have to choose from. I find myself switching between them on a regular basis. I think they could improve this quite a bit - perhaps ill get an update. Stromer - If you are reading this, reach out to me and I'll provide a bunch of feedback.

I added a mirror and upgraded the handle grips.

SUMMARY:
I would buy it again in a heartbeat. 28mph is a must - glad I got that 35 mph would be even better. Get a body float - my bumpy broken asphalt paths would have killed me without it.

Happy to answer questions if anyone has them - I probably could have written twice as much. I plan to do some videos as there is not a lot of info on the ST1x and I can walk through some of the above in more detail.

"86 and still kicking has got it right"...good advice and well worth the money. I made arrangements with our local bike dealer to service the mechanicals on the bike before purchasing (ST-2), as I too bought on the internet because of my distance from anyone selling the Stromer bikes. One has way too much money invested in the machine to not have it serviced as needed. Stromer has been great with any of the problems I have run into (as in replacing my OMNI unit). They sent a new unit along with instructions on how to install it correctly. I communicate with them whenever I fell the need and their service is way above par in my experience.
In regard to shifting, I had to reteach myself to let up on the pedaling pressure before making gear changes, finding that I was exerting more pressure because of the electric assist on keeping a steady cadence. I still miss a decent shift once in awhile, but it is much improved. I have carbon fork on my bike but am looking into a handlebar stem that has elastomer properties similar to the BodyFloat which I have installed on my seat post at https://redshiftsports.com/shockstop- suspension-stem. Check it out, especially so if you have some rough riding patches on your commute. Best of luck with your new purchase and I hope that you enjoy it as much as I have mine...it is a great bike! I enjoyed your post...

nwroller
1 month ago

I thought I would give my ST1x review as it has been around a month and 200 miles since I received it in the mail. Sorry for the long post, but I hope someone will find all the information useful.

ORDER:
I decided to place an order with an E-bike shop instead of buying from my local shop because of the massive savings I received. I ordered the Sport (high bar) in 22" and charcoal. The shop upgraded me to the ST2 battery (814wh) and provided a body float seat post for a small charge. I got an email from Stromer the day after I placed the order to setup my account/app as the shop tied my bike to my phone number before it was shipped. It took about 12 days in total to get the bike, but there was a holiday weekend that increased that time. 7-10 days is probably reasonable expectation. Saving the 10% Seattle sales tax was also a contributing factor as they included shipping for free. All said and done very happy with the price and the shop I ordered from and would not have done it different.

RECEIVING:
The bike is in a large box that weights over 60 lbs. Because of this there was a local delivery company that did the final transit. Due to this it took an extra weekend to get to me because I had to schedule the delivery. They showed up in a 18-wheeler which caused the driver to have some issues blocking traffic on a busy road to hand truck the bike to my door. But all arrived safely and he wheeled it into my garage.

The bike came nearly fully assembled. I needed to straighten the handle bars (mm allen wrench) which was pretty easy (they are shipped at 90 degrees so the box is flatter). The peddles also needed to be screwed on - the right side goes on traditionally, the left is reverse threaded. I swapped out the seat post (cannot remember if the seat was on the bike or not when shipped), and I was all ready to go. Wheel reflectors, the charger were also in the box with manuals. The first charge took about 2-3 hours to be fully charged.

INITIAL IMPRESSIONS:
So much fun. I had tried out electric bikes before, but this was my first Speed Pedelec and really glad I went that direction, it is addicting. Some people say you work just as hard on an e-bike, but it is hard to explain why. I don't burn as many calories, but your muscles are still sore. You want to work hard just to maintain the speed and always feel the boost. So you work as hard, but over a shorter period of time because you are going so much faster.

The ST1x has a boost/throttle - kind of. If you hold the [+] button it will move you without peddling. But I have yet to have a situation where I could not peddle faster than the boost. On a flat it will get you to about 10-12 mph, on a decent hill you are lucky to get half that. In all cases I can get the bike to go at least 20%-100% faster by peddling at a moderate rate. The brakes squeak a bit (see the EBR videos, sounds the exact same) but they are solid. I am 6'3" 220lbs. The frame size is pretty good for me, but if you are 6'5" I think you might find it a bit too small - and they don't make it any bigger.

I have had several friends take it for a spin, they're all in love with it.

200 MILE REVIEW:
I have had a few issues so lets get those out of the way. About 20 miles in the right peddle was wobbling considerably. I took the peddle off and the aluminum threads were stripped. I put the peddle on so it is possible it was something I did, but I am pretty good with tools and am pretty sure it was a factory defect. I called the bike shop I ordered from and they shipped an entirely new bottom bracket and crankset. It took around 7 days to get that and another 2-3 for a bike shop to do the work (I did not have the right tools). It is working perfectly now. It was all done under warranty through the bike shop I purchased from - I d not call Stromer. All I had to do was send in photos and provide a write up. I think this was more to make sure they sent the right part than not trusting me.

At 100 miles I got a rear flat. Of course I didn't have a spare, pump or tools with me (Murphy!) so my wife picked me up and I swapped the tube with the same kind that came with the bike. I now have a trunk bag with a spare tube, tools and a pump. All of which I had, just not with me at the time.

I have a few complaints as well. The bike creeks a lot. Not sure what exactly is making the sound, but it sounds like tapping on a carbon frame (there is no Carbon), and it bothers me, but does not seem to an issue. Could be that I am too fat. The drivetrain is a little bit clunky. It does not shift as crisp as I would hope. Again, not an issue, but it bothers me. I have learned that if I am not in the right gear it will either not shift right away or will shift really hard. So as I come to a stop I move up a few sprockets to a larger one, and then gradually down shift as I pick up speed. I rarely ever use the largest cogs as with the motor it is rarely needed (even in 10-12% grade)

Absolutely love riding this bike. I rarely take it out of assist level 3 just because it is so much fun. I ride about 14 miles round trip to work and it takes me about 20-25 minutes each way - my commute is across a valley so steep hills going each way with some flat in the middle and a hand full of signals that have a long rotation. I average about 16-20mph. During peak traffic I can easily make the trip quicker than I could in a car. If I took it really easy I could probably get away without showering at work, but the way I ride I always sweat a bit. I charge it every other day and usually have about 50% battery left after the 28 miles. I have not rode it outside of commuting yet, so I have yet to test the range.

OMNI is alright. Signal strength is terrible and does not work from my house. I have a secure bike cage at work so I have only used the electric lock once. I don't really like the screens they have to choose from. I find myself switching between them on a regular basis. I think they could improve this quite a bit - perhaps ill get an update. Stromer - If you are reading this, reach out to me and I'll provide a bunch of feedback.

I added a mirror and upgraded the handle grips.

SUMMARY:
I would buy it again in a heartbeat. 28mph is a must - glad I got that 35 mph would be even better. Get a body float - my bumpy broken asphalt paths would have killed me without it.

Happy to answer questions if anyone has them - I probably could have written twice as much. I plan to do some videos as there is not a lot of info on the ST1x and I can walk through some of the above in more detail.

america94
1 month ago

Received a nice email from AliExpress this morning informing me that my extension bar had been delivered to my community mail box. Great service! only 11 days from order in China to my mailbox via ePacket :-)

I must say I am impressed. Very well built, 100% metal/carbon, super light yet very strong. Installed as per @Denis Shelston's suggestion and removed the LCD display. Gotta go that route indeed, thanks Denis.

What I especially like about it (beside the great look) is to finally get a normal size tube compared to the handlebar, so accessories fit perfectly and are stuck like glue. Moved the new headlight and phone holder for now. Considered the bottle holder, but I am afraid it won't handle the constant pressure of putting the bottle back in.

Leaving room for possibly a new GoPro like camera (or a strong horn). My son has a camera that he doesn't use, might borrow it for a while before buying one to see if it's worth it.

Here are some pics:

1/5
Nutella
1 month ago

Yeah, a carbon bike with a $1600 drivetrain and $1500 forks for $250? Sign me up

ShumaBike
1 month ago

I Just ordered the Voltbike Enduro(back ordered till 8/3). I'm 5'6" and wonder, based on your feedback, if the bike's to big for someone my size? Currently have a Specialized Roubaix and street ride around 1200 miles/yr. At 65 I'm thinking I would enjoy and look forward more to biking if the hills were not an issue so E Bike sounds like the perfect choice. Not afraid to spend more for a bike that's a better fit/quality, but can't see spending $4k if I don't have to.. I'm looking for recommendations on an E Bike comparable to the Enduro that's maybe a better fit for someone my size, but if a new seat post and handle bar mount/bars will solve the problem than that's fine. Your thoughts?

Hi George! To tell you the truth I'm not entirely sure. My primary issue with the bikes scale is storage. I live in a second story apartment, so lugging the long and heavy bike up and down daily can be difficult. If you need to traverse stairs I would strongly suggest looking for a shorter and lighter bike. The weight isn't really out of line with other non aluminum/carbon full suspension ebikes, though you may be able to shave some pounds with something that doesn't have rear suspension.

The seat can get quite low, it's issue is actually that it can't go very high. I wouldn't really be too concerned about the step over and seat height. The difficulties with the bike are entirely in it's length and weight for me.

At 1,200 miles you sound more than strong enough for the bike when you're actually riding it, and the pedal assist makes it quite easy most of the time. I can't speak to your situation with storage and travel, so it's going to come down to how often you need to lift the bike off it's wheels. If you like to pack the bike up and travel I'd definitely suggest finding a smaller model.

mrgold35
1 month ago

1. The Radrover has bottle cage attachment points on the bottom side of down tube. I removed the Zefal straps, drilled holes in the Zefal for bottle cage points, and used the longer bottle cage security screws that came with the Boomerang unit to secure both. It also works with regular bottle cage screws without the Boomerang unit. It was the little touches like the 3 bottle cage attachment points that made me pick the Radrover.

2. The handlebars on the Radrover curve and angle too much and there isn't a lot of real estate for extra accessories. I had the same bar extender on my old bike I test fitted and the extender fit perfectly under the Radrover LCD screen. It holds my iPhone 6S Plus and extra headlight in place on the trail rides and still has some play if I need to adjust up/down on the fly. I now have a level spot for my iphone and extra headlight instead of crowding the handlebars, Amazon, $20: https://www.amazon.com/BM-WORKS-Speed-Extender-Lightweight/dp/B00M13QMVA/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1499526771&sr=8-1&keywords=bm+works+extender

3. GOTD, Amazon, pack of two, $5, long shipping time from China: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LCPFQNM/ref=od_aui_detailpages00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
I trimmed the thumb throttle a little bit so it wouldn't get in the way of me reaching the gear changer and throttle on/off button. I had an extra piece of the Lizard Skin carbon fiber sticker to dress up the throttle a little bit.

Lizard Skin, Amazon, $22: https://www.amazon.com/Lizard-Skins-Adhesive-Protectors/dp/B01DH2194I/ref=pd_sbs_468_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B01M5IMSNT&pd_rd_r=K3KGVE76QZMD3XRRRZAJ&pd_rd_w=bfBU2&pd_rd_wg=pQFF5&refRID=K3KGVE76QZMD3XRRRZAJ&th=1&psc=1

mrgold35
1 month ago

I have a black and white (his and her) 16 Radrovers since Sept of 2016. I have about 1200-1300 miles per Rad with a good mix of work commuting (13 miles roundtrip) and fun/trail riding. I've added, replaced, and upgraded over the months and I now have the Radrover the way I like it. The next upgrade will be the convert the brakes to the TRP HY/RD hydraulic brakes.

Bike
- Luna Cycle triangle bag
- 1 Spare Radrover battery
- BC wide platform MTB pedals (black with red versions)
- Zefal lower downtube frame guard
- Arundel Looney adjustable water bottle holder
- Topeak Uni Super rear rack with Topeak MTX DTP Quicktrack rack bag
- RRP neoguard MTB mudguard
- Planet Bike Big Buck front fat tire fender
- Lizard Skin top tube protector (clear for white RR, Carbon fiber for Black RR)
- Problem solvers bottle cage height adaptor

Handlebars
- Sunlite 95mm 0-60 degree adjustable handlebar stem
- four 2.5mm spacers for Sunlite stem (two per bike)
- BM Works handlebar speed extenter
- GOTD plastic ebike thumb throttle
- Vibrelli Universal iPhone holder (work perfectly for my iPhone 6S Plus with Mophie battery case)
- Xlarge Bar Mitts (winter only)

Seat/seatpost
- Cloud9 11.5X12.5 suspension seat
- ISM Touring saddle (for wife to help with standover straddle)
- Suntour SP12 NCX 400mm seatpost
- Bodyfloat 350mm v2.0 orange spring

Wheels
- Vee8 120 tpi tires
- Mr. Tuffy 3XL liners
- Stans tire sealant
- red chrome valve stem cap

Helmets
- Fox Flux (his)
- Louis Garneau LG Roaota (her)
- AirStreamz noise reducer
- Bike Peddler helmet mount rear view mirror
- Light and Motion Vis 180
- Niterider 2200 and 1800 lights

Lights
- Niterider Pro 3600 lights
- Brightz LED 5 color lights (side illumination)
- Light and Motion Vis 180 on Topeak rack

Security
- Boomerang GPS tracker and alarm
- Xena XC-14 5 foot 14mm chain
- Xena XSU-310 18mm U-bolt
- Xena XUL-210 18mm alarmed U-bolt
- 15 foot security cable with lock

Misc Accessories
- Osprey Radial 34 Commuter Backpack (his)
- Osprey Comet Daypack (hers)
- Saris SuperClamp Freedom 4 bike rack
- Bike Hand Pro bike stand
- Extra RR battery charger to leave at work

1/11
Mark Peralta
1 month ago

it is an 800Li. from way back. this is second battery but older so no surprise. wish the battery could be easily removed. its quite hard to get them out.
I assume it's an Optibike, and it has a 36 volt, 20ah Li-Ion.
Here's the rest of the spec:
Performance and frame specifications:
Stock Range: 45 miles - electric only; 57 miles - moderate pedaling
Stock run time: 1 hour in fast mode; 2.25 hours in economy mode
Top Speed: 20 mph - electric only; 27 mph-light pedal assist; 34 + mph - moderate pedaling assist
Battery Type: 36 volt, 20ah Li-Ion
Motor Type: High efficiency, brushless DC motor with rare earth, Neodymium Iron Boron magnets
Motor Drive: Patented Motorized Bottom Bracket (MBB)
Controller: Derivative Power Control (DPC)
Motor Power: 800w continuous power
Charge Time: 7 hours
Overall Weight: 57 lbs.
Suspension: Stock full suspension. Front: Fox 32 Talas RLC Fork; Rear: Fox Float RP23 Shock
Brakes: Avid Juicy Carbon
Gears: Shimano XT 7 speed derailleur
Shifter: Sram Grip-Shift
Frame: Monocoque aluminum frame
Headset: Cane Creek 110
Color: Red
Wheels: Mavic 26" wheels, Cross trail Disk
Lights: Integrated dual beam UltraBright 10w Halogen headlamp
Source: http://www.weiku.com/products/7989972/Optibike_800_Li_electric_bike_specifications.html

Here is the dissaembly of the battery and it is mentioned that All Cell may be the battery vendor.
https://www.electricbike.com/optibike-battery-pack/
In any case, frame still has to be taken apart plus the battery itself could easily cost you in the low one thousand dollars. And it is an old ebike with throttle only and no PAS. To me it is not worth the hassle.

For slightly more money, you get what I believe will be a better bike like the VoltBike enduro.

here's the rest of the info. https://electricbikereview.com/voltbike/enduro/

Nikita Onassis
3 months ago

It was worth maybe 5 K to 7 K when it was made for its aesthetics and lack of electric scooters within that range then. Today 2016, there are many electric bike alternatives.
Two flaws is basic engineering perhaps if you looked at a bicycle and electric scooter, which is spring seats and trainer wheels axle and spring. You can get electric scooter of 8 kg with similar range like "emicro one" for a third of Vs, 11kg version price.

pagb22
5 months ago

You might not know what you're watching but I certainly know what I am!

NickTheAsome
9 months ago

it's not worth 4 grand

fatin yusoff
9 months ago

a they sell it at laxada

TERESA ONA
12 months ago

It's a nice bike and seems very useful but too expensive, 8k dollars? too much

Linda Nitzschke
1 year ago

I think I'll stick with my Trikke Pon-e 48v, thank you!!  Costs a lot less, and you can either get some exercise doing the carving motion...or just ride it.  Goes a little faster, too, and has at least twice the range.

TeroBassed
1 year ago

wow!"!11 a bike that goes fast as you could run when theres elecric scooters that go up to 40km/h that cost less than 1000 dollars. just buy an motorbike. lol

Self Help Stoner
1 month ago

TeroBassed yup or a moped

Red Woods
2 years ago

Ridiculous over-priced yuppy toy. All that design effort wasted on a low sale product,

DE_MACHO_NACHO 21
2 years ago

did you notice the guy middle fingering you at 2:29

CharlesBass627
2 years ago

More like the yikes bike

Stephane Plays
2 years ago

Did you se the guy in the background when he was riding it

tubularmonkeymaniac
2 years ago

"I don't even know what I'm watching now"...pans down to girls behind

Alex Paulsen
2 years ago

I hate these because they carry their own rules here in New Zealand, which requires the proper authorities to make some rules for it. They're allowed to be used on pedestrian access ways, which I think is foolish, yet they deserve no place on the road either. They're noisy, slow, and they have a pathetic range.

Yasser Bargaba
2 years ago

Waste of money

Nabil Ouchen
2 years ago

Chuck
Cyndi

fretting

Boki Mne
2 years ago

Awesome!! Price is litle to much but I am realy impressed!

Josh DeWall
2 years ago

Wow that horn was soooo LOUD! not

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Josh DeWall As someone with a loud, rude mouth... you would know ;)

Josh DeWall
2 years ago

Looks almost as ridiculous as your glasses and worse then your stupid shoes! Too much bulky plastic. Looks like it came out of the late or early 90's. But it does look kinda cool but it can't be easy to ride. Why not spend your energy in making something easier to drive?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Josh DeWall It's not very easy to ride at first but then gets kind of fun. I'm not sure it's the ebike I'd choose to buy but it was fun to see. I think their latest model features the three wheel design for stability: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/154074401/yikebike-undiscovered

Dusty Kessler
2 years ago

Wow, this is a great review. Not sure how I'm just now finding out about this company but they look amazing. If you don't mind me asking, how were you able to get a demo on the YikeBike? I am guessing this is at some sort of convention in Vegas. I'm also wondering if you would be willing to forward me any names of a YB product reps you may have. My mother has limited mobility due to MS and I think this would be a game changer for her. Thanks!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

Hi Dustin, great guess! I attended Interbike in 2013 and was able to test ride this and other products at the show. I do not have direct contact information for the YikeBike team unfortunately... I tried to contact them earlier this year about the Kickstarter campaign they launched but nobody responded.

Garry Byrne
2 years ago

I think I know how it got it's name. Someone asked the price and, upon hearing it, went: "yike!".

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+Garry Byrne Ha! I could see that... this thing is quite expensive and I'm not sure the design is right. They have a new model on Kickstarter that seems to be doing well: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/154074401/yikebike-undiscovered

James Chambers
2 years ago

What's the battery life/range of these Yikebikes?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 years ago

+James Chambers I estimate 7 to 10 miles depending on rider weight, terrain and weather. Full specs including voltage and watt hours at http://electricridereview.com/yikebike/carbon/